Useful Tips On Paints

Saturday, 6. April 2019

Many wonder, with good reason, whether to learn painting is necessary to knowing how to draw. The answer is that if it is necessary and even some would say it is indispensable. Charcoal pencil is the most recommended to paint because enhance the drawing and allows best strokes, moreover it is not difficult to achieve. A good exercise for all those who just learn the secrets of the paintings is made vertical, horizontal, and diagonal strokes without take off the pen from the surface. This exercise must be carried out using the entire arm and not simply by moving the wrist. In paintings one must have consistency in sizes, for which necessary visual education that allow differentiate different proportions of drawn objects, especially if it is of portraits or human body. One of the most important points in the painting is the use of color. No matter that kind of technique or style is used, the color can make a difference if used with property.

Colors can convey much more than we think, even each color it presents various shades. Another good exercise is to mix colors to get derivatives of greater or lesser proportion. Credit: Cyrus Massoumi humbition-2011. Through the basic colors, blue, red and yellow can be a lot of colors and a multitude of shades. Easily start in paints is with watercolors, the only drawback is that it is almost impossible to correct errors because this style is quite transparent and could modify the initial color. A well-developed watercolor can become a true work of art. It is undeniable that the watercolor is not so considered oil paintings but does not mean that it is lesser quality work if carried out with professionalism.

Brief History

Wednesday, 13. February 2019

The pages of the history of the invention and construction of metronomes, are full of failure and impractical ideas, but if we can find some success. Why a tiny sector attracted so many inventors is a mystery. First attempts in 1581, Galileo Galilei discovered the isochronism of pendulums, i.e., discovered that pendulums equals (of any length) vibrate at the same time regardless if the amplitude is large or small. Close to a century passed before the theory of pendulums was successfully applied to the manufacture of clocks by Christian Huygens (1659) and George Graham (1715). In 1656 patented you first pendulum clock, which allowed to measure time more accurately.

Huygens was built several clocks pendulum to determine the longitude at sea, which made several trips between 1662 and 1686. These inventors solved the problem of pulses of pendulums using a leak or exhaust, that would keep it moving without interfering with its movement. This invention was the key the success was immediately used by those working in the field of metronome. In 1696, Etieune Loulie made the first attempt to apply the pendulum of a metronome. His team was no more than an adjustable pendulum with calibrations, but without exhaust to keep it moving.

It was followed by a line of inventors, including Sauveur, 1711; Enbrayg, 1732; 1771 Gabary, Harrison, 1775; Davaux 1784; Pelletier, Weiske, 1790; Weber, 1813; Stockel, Zmeskall, Aperture, Smart, 1821. Edward Scott Mead may find this interesting as well. Most of these attempts were unsuccessful due to the great length of pendulum needed to imitate some of the slow rhythms used in music (e.g., 40 to 60 per minute). In 1812, Nikolaus Winkel Dietrik (born-1780 Amsterdam, dead-1826) found that a pendulum weighted and double (a weight to each side of the pivot) could oscillate at a slow pace, even when they were short. Johann Nepenuk Maelzel, through some questionable practices, appropriated the idea of Winkel, and in 1816 began to manufacture the so-called metronome Maelzel.